State spent $2K for coffee at North Point Marina in past 2 years

Kristina Rasmussen

Spreading liberty. Wife. Mom. Quilter. Rider. Traveler.

Kristina Rasmussen
November 21, 2014

State spent $2K for coffee at North Point Marina in past 2 years

Illinois state government spent more than $2,000 during the last two years on coffee

Illinois state government spent more than $2,000 during the last two years providing coffee, creamer and sugar packets “to better serve guest boaters at IDNR North Point Marina.”

The state paid Belle Coffee Service $838.50 in 2013 and $1,219.50 in 2014 according to the comptroller’s transparency website, The Ledger.

A call to the marina confirmed that coffee service is provided to visitors free of charge.

According to the Illinois Department of Natural Resource’s website, “North Point Marina is the largest marina on the Great Lakes and located on Lake Michigan midway between Chicago and Milwaukee.”

Among its many amenities:

“Quiet, serene and safe, North Point Marina offers the relaxation you expect and the nurturing you need in a natural and lush recreational setting.

“A world-class marina and a world-class value to you, North Point Marina has convenient on-site amenities such as boat maintenance and repair, fuel, dry winter storage, transient slips, club room, beaches, ship’s store and restaurant.

“In a protected floating dock system of 1,500 slips, from 30 to 60 feet, the “one price” slip rentals include electricity, water, cable TV hookup, sanitary pump-outs, dock lockers, showers and restrooms, reserved parking near your slip and 24 hours security . . . no extra charge.”

The coffee bill was paid for out of the Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach Marina Fund (formerly known as the Illinois Beach Marina Fund). According to a report from Commission on Government Forecasting and Accountability, operating income from the marina goes into this fund.

While its preferable that “perks” such as free coffee at state facilities are paid from related user fees, it raises the question of whether fees could go down if low-priority spending came to stop.

Image source. 

Want more? Get stories like this delivered straight to your inbox.

Thank you, we'll keep you informed!