Illinois’ comeback story starts here.

Fixing Illinois pension crisis by amending nation’s most-restrictive pension law is legal, effective

Fixing Illinois pension crisis by amending nation’s most-restrictive pension law is legal, effective

Illinois is home to one of the worst pension crises in the country.1 At 39% funded, according to the nonpartisan Pew Charitable Trusts, Illinois has the worst pension funding ratio of any state.2 By contrast, neighboring Wisconsin’s pension system is 103% funded.3 In fiscal year 2022, Illinois’ total gen­eral funds pension costs, includ­ing pension bond...

By Joe Tabor

Ep. 49: More union money floods Illinois politics

Ep. 49: More union money floods Illinois politics

Illinois unions members give hundreds of dollars a year to union dues. But most of that money is spent on politics – not representing workers’ interests or protecting them. Mailee Smith follows the money. She joins the Policy Shop to show where government union money goes and why Amendment 1 would harm all Illinoisans. This...

Chicago pension funds still among nation’s worst funded

Chicago pension funds still among nation’s worst funded

Over-promised benefits continue to sink Chicago’s finances as the recent bear market eats into 2021 stock market gains. Investments gaining 25% last year plus federal aid didn’t offer much help to city pension systems, which have more debt than 45 states.

By Seton O'Scannlain

Illinois retiree: Amendment 1 could cost me my home

Illinois retiree: Amendment 1 could cost me my home

Voters decide Nov. 8 whether to pass Amendment 1 – a hidden tax hike that could cost Illinois taxpayers, including fixed-income retirees, their homes and put homeownership farther out of reach for young families.

By Ann Miller

‘Workers’ Rights Amendment’ website ignores tax hike

‘Workers’ Rights Amendment’ website ignores tax hike

The government union-backed website claims Amendment 1 would put more money in the pockets of working Illinoisans, but the change could only benefit the 7% who are government employees. All families would pay $2,149 more in property taxes.

By Patrick Andriesen

Ep. 48: The housing market goes bust

Ep. 48: The housing market goes bust

After a few years of homes flying off the market, signs are indicating the market is starting to cool. Is a housing bubble going to burst? Bryce Hill joins the Policy Shop to discuss what’s going on in Illinois’ housing world, how prices fair today and what to expect next. This week’s Policy Shop is...